Tag Archives: New York City

Little Italy Isn’t Dead: Puglia

Periodically, there’s an article about how Little Italy is dead or dying. Yes, it’s more of a tourist destination and less of a neighborhood where Italian people live. There are still some Italians there, and there are Italian-American-owned businesses there. A recent article in the New York Times made me want to write a series on Little Italy Isn’t Dead and feature some of the businesses there.

Puglia

In 1919, Italian immigrant Gregorio Garofalo opened Puglia, named after the region in Italy where he was from. The restaurant used to serve Italian specialties like capozello (sheep’s head) and tripe, but now its menu includes more standard and popular Italian favorites. Puglia is known for its entertainment. It’s a good stop during the San Gennaro festival too.

Advertisements

Little Italy Isn’t Dead: Vincent’s

Periodically, there’s an article about how Little Italy is dead or dying. Yes, it’s more of a tourist destination and less of a neighborhood where Italian people live. There are still some Italians there, and there are Italian-American-owned businesses there. A recent article in the New York Times made me want to write a series on Little Italy Isn’t Dead and feature some of the businesses there.

Vincent’s

In the late 1800s, Italian immigrants Giuseppe and Carmela Siano sold clams and other seafood from a cart on Mott and Hester Streets. In 1904, they created a restaurant in the same spot and named it Vincent’s Clam House, for their son. They are famous for their calamari, which they serve with a hot tomato sauce. Their tomato sauce is also famous and available at stores nationwide.

Dina’s 10 Favorite Things About Spring in NYC

I love every season in my favorite city, New York. Spring in New York is great because it starts to warm up (usually). As with every season in New York, there are many events. These are my favorite.

My favorite things about spring in New York City:

  1. When it actually is spring…
  2. The Easter parade–Historically, this was a day for New York’s well-to-do to parade up and down Fifth Avenue in their finery. Today, it’s another excuse (which New Yorkers love) to wear a costume. This parade is all about hats. The crazier the better. And the best part is you can be in the parade. Don your creative hat and join in the fun!
  3. The Orchid Show at the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx–The gardens are a great day trip from the city, and what better excuse than to view the orchids.  
  4. Ukrainian festival–The St. George Ukrainian Festival occurs each May on East. 7th Street in the East Village, celebrating Ukrainian food, music, dancing and culture. This year’s festival is May 18-20. This area used to be a Ukrainian neighborhood. You can also visit the Ukrainian Museum.
  5. Street fairs–This is a great time of year for street fairs and festivals. As the weather warms up, it’s nice to be outside and checking out what the vendors have to offer. On the weekend, there’s usually a street fair somewhere.
  6. Ninth Avenue International Food Festival–This outdoor street festival celebrates the diversity of food available in Hell’s Kitchen. Local restaurants set up booths along Ninth Ave. selling their specialties. 
  7. Fleet Week–Fleet Week is eagerly awaited by every single New York female. It’s a time when sailors and Marines are on leave and carouse the streets of Manhattan, especially Hell’s Kitchen where they are docked. There are many special events scheduled around the city and at the Intrepid Museum in Midtown to celebrate.
  8. Taste of the Upper West Side–This is a fun event that celebrates the restaurants of the Upper West Side neighborhood of Manhattan. There are food celebrities, tastings, and music.
  9. St. Anthony Fest–This is an annual festival on the Saint’s feast day, June 13, celebrating St. Anthony of Padua at the church that bears his name on Sullivan and Houston Streets in Soho. There are masses throughout the day, food in the church hall, and a procession throughout the village that anyone can participate in, and the giving away of loaves of bread. If you are Catholic, it is a very spiritual event and even if you are not Catholic, it is great to see how busy New York traffic stops for a moment as the procession walks by.
  10. Roses at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden–The roses are in bloom in June at the Cranford Rose Garden of the Brooklyn Botanic Garden and are a must-see. The beauty and peace of the gardens is a welcome break from the concrete jungle.

 

 

 

Little Italy Isn’t Dead: Caffe Palermo

Periodically, there’s an article about how Little Italy is dead or dying. Yes, it’s more of a tourist destination and less of a neighborhood where Italian people live. There are still some Italians there, and there are Italian-American-owned businesses there. A recent article in the New York Times made me want to write a series on Little Italy Isn’t Dead and feature some of the businesses there.

Caffe Palermo

Caffe Palermo is home to the king of cannoli, but they also have other great pastries too like this wonderful cassata cake. The café was opened in 1973 by John DeLutro. It’s definitely a must during the San Gennaro festival.

cassata from Caffe Palermo

 

Little Italy Isn’t Dead: The Legendary Ferrara

Periodically, there’s an article about how Little Italy is dead or dying. Yes, it’s more of a tourist destination and less of a neighborhood where Italian people live. There are still some Italians there, and there are Italian-American-owned businesses there. A recent article in the New York Times made me want to write a series on Little Italy Isn’t Dead and feature some of the businesses there.

Ferrara

Ferrara, a legendary Italian pastry shop, opened in 1892 by Enrico Scoppa and Antonio Ferrara.  The fifth-generation pastry shop gained fame when Enrico Caruso became a regular.  Ferrara’s became well-known for its cannoli and torrone.  Talk about being a kid in a candy store.  I take one look at the glass case of glistening glazed fruit atop an array of pastries in a myriad of colors, and I’m mesmerized.  The pastry case at Ferrara’s is a work of art.  When I talk to people who’ve never been to an Italian bakery, I show them pictures of Ferrara’s.  Everyone in my family will attest to Ferrara’s being the gold standard of New York Italian pastries.

Ferrara’s pastries

Little Italy Isn’t Dead: La Bella Ferrara

Periodically, there’s an article about how Little Italy is dead or dying. Yes, it’s more of a tourist destination and less of a neighborhood where Italian people live. There are still some Italians there, and there are Italian-American-owned businesses there. A recent article in the New York Times made me want to write a series on Little Italy Isn’t Dead and feature some of the businesses there.

La Bella Ferrara

Opened in 1970 by Sicilian immigrants Frank and Nick Angileri, La Bella Ferrara is an old-school Italian bakery. The smell of freshly baked Italian cookies greets you as you open the door. I’ve tried so many cookies and pastries here and have never been disappointed.

Little Italy Isn’t Dead: Umberto’s Clam House

Periodically, there’s an article about how Little Italy is dead or dying. Yes, it’s more of a tourist destination and less of a neighborhood where Italian people live. There are still some Italians there, and there are Italian-American-owned businesses there. A recent article in the New York Times made me want to write a series on Little Italy Isn’t Dead and feature some of the businesses there.

Umberto’s Clam House

Umberto Ianniello, who came to the United States from Naples in 1934, opened his clam house in 1972 and the restaurant is now run by his son, Robert. The restaurant started out selling only seafood, but now it has a full menu with pasta and meats as well.