Tag Archives: Easter

Natural Dye for Easter Eggs

This year, when coloring eggs, I experimented with some natural Easter egg dye from vegetables and spices.  The top row are various shades of blue from red cabbage on brown eggs (the left two) and white eggs (the right two).  The second row are reds, pink and browns from onion skins and beets.  From left to right:  red from yellow onion on a brown egg, pink from beet juice on a white egg, brown from onion skin on a white egg and brown from onion skin on a brown egg.  The bottom row are shades of yellow from turmeric.

This method is more time-consuming and laborious than just buying a PAAS kit. The results are not instantaneous either.  And the colors are not as exciting…but it is SAFER and HEALTHIER.

I used onion skins, turmeric, beet juice, and red cabbage to get brown, yellow, pink, and blue eggs.  The red cabbage worked out the best.  Turmeric would be the winner because it made a nice yellow and it was the easiest to do.  For all the eggs, be sure to refrigerate them as they are soaking in the dye, especially overnight.

Blue Eggs

2 heads red cabbage

6 cups water

6 tablespoons white vinegar

a dozen hard-boiled white and brown eggs

Roughly chop the cabbage. In a large pot, add water and vinegar.  Bring to a boil, then lower heat. Cover and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain the cabbage and reserve the “dye.”  Let it cool.  Put it in a smaller pot or bowl so that it will cover the eggs.   This should be enough for a dozen eggs, give or take one or two.  These will take on good color in no time.  I left some in overnight.  The brown eggs are a deep bluish-green and the white eggs are a nice blue.  If you soak them for only a few minutes, they will be a lighter blue.

Red eggs

12 yellow onions

4 cups water

4 teaspoons white vinegar

6 eggs, not pre-boiled

Skin the onions. Put onion skin, water and vinegar in a large pot. Bring to a boil, then lower heat. Cover and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain the skins and reserve the “dye.”  Let it cool. Put it in a smaller pot or bowl so that it will cover the eggs (add a little water if you need to). Boil the eggs as you would for hard-boiled eggs.  I brought them to a boil, then shut off the heat and let them sit, covered for 10 minutes.  The color on brown eggs is very deep red.  Leave in overnight for best color.  I did not try these on white eggs because I ran out, so I want to do it again on white eggs.

Now, if you don’t boil the eggs in the dye and just soak them in the onion dye, they will be brown, not red.

 

Brown eggs

1 bag red onions

4 cups water

4 tablespoons vinegar

6 hard-boiled white and brown eggs

Skin the onions. Put onion skin, water and vinegar in a large pot. Bring to a boil, then lower heat. Cover and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain the skins and reserve the “dye.”  Let it cool. Put it in a smaller pot or bowl so that it will cover the eggs.  Leave in overnight for best color.  You can see the brown eggs are darker and more reddish-brown than the white eggs.

Yellow eggs

3 teaspoons turmeric powder

3 tablespoons white vinegar

6 white eggs, not pre-boiled

water to cover eggs

Put all in a pot.  Boil as you would hard-boiled eggs. I brought it to a boil, turned off the heat, covered it and let it sit for 10 minutes.  Then, I rinsed them and let them dry.

Pink eggs

Juice from two cans or two packages of beets

6 white hard-boiled eggs

Add some water so that the juice will cover eggs.  Soak overnight.

OK, these don’t really get very pink.  I want to try these again using fresh beets because the color is supposed to be hot pink.  Stay tuned.

 

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Treats From Leftover Easter Candy

Do you have some leftover Easter candy and don’t know what to do with it?  Well, so did I, so I made some treats with it.  First, I had gotten two Reese’s peanut butter eggs and a Reese’s peanut butter bunny.  So I made this Easy Easter Pie from Hershey’s website.   What I did–Instead of the 20 Reese’s peanut butter cups and 50 Hershey’s Kisses, I used one of the peanut butter eggs and the peanut butter bunny and melted them in a double boiler.  I didn’t have a prepared graham cracker crust, but I did have graham cracker crumbs, so I made one.

peanut butter pie

I also made Rice Krispie Treats from leftover Peeps.  I had a pack of five pink and a rainbow stick with four multicolored Peeps.  So I added regular mashmallows and made the treats the traditional way.

rice krispie treats

They had a light pink hue to them that you can see better in the following picture.  Here’s a piece of the peanut butter pie too.

Easter treats

 

Italian Easter Rice Pie

This year for Easter, I made an Italian Easter rice pie.  I’ve written before about the Italian Easter pies, the pizza chiena, or pizza rustica, and the pastiera, or pizza grano.  This is a variation of the pizza grano.  The pizza grano is a Neapolitan wheat pie served at Easter.  My family traditionally made this pie at Easter time.  Part of my dad’s family is from the area near Benevento, Italy, and there they make a variation with rice instead of wheat.  So he grew up with both the wheat and rice pies at Easter.

I wanted to be ambitious this Easter/Lent and make a lot more, but I haven’t had the time.  I had wanted to make hot cross buns, but instead just got some yummy ones from a bakery.  I’m also going to make a pizza chiena.  My grandma has a variation of the pizza chiena that is vegetarian, using mashed potatoes.  I don’t think I will be making that one this year though, as I don’t have time.  Now, I do have a homemade crust recipe, but I can’t publish it or else I may get the malocchio from my aunt.

IMG_1797

Italian Easter Rice Pie

1 1/2 cups whole milk or 1 cup skim/1/2% milk and 1/2 cup light cream/half and half

1/2 cup rice

5 eggs

1 cup sugar

1 pound ricotta (I use Calabro brand.)

1 tablespoon orange blossom water  (You can find this at any Italian specialty shop like Di Palo’s or order it online.)

1 teaspoon vanilla

8 oz. candied citron  (You can find this at any Italian specialty shop like Di Palo’s or order it online.)

1 deep dish frozen pie crust

1 regular frozen pie crust

Cook rice according to package directions (with water).  Add milk and cook on low until milk is absorbed.  Cool.  Beat eggs and beat in sugar.  Add ricotta, orange blossom water, vanilla and citron and stir.  Put into deep dish pie crust and top with top crust.  (I used a regular pie crust for the top and cut strips with a pastry cutter.)  Bake at 350 for 1 hour.  Cool and serve.

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5 Easter Recipes

Some fun Easter recipes from the Web:

1. Easter egg hunt pound cake from Not Your Momma’s Cookie

photo used with permission of Not Your Momma's Cookie

photo used with permission of Not Your Momma’s Cookie

2.  Peanut butter cookie pie from Crazy for Crust

Peanut butter cookie pie from Crazy for Crust

photo used with permission of Crazy for Crust

3.  Soft and chewy M&Ms cookies from Averie Cooks

photo used with permission of Averie Cooks

photo used with permission of Averie Cooks

4.  Braided Easter bread from Emma Eats

photo used with permission of Emma Eats

photo used with permission of Emma Eats

5.  Nest candy Easter recipe from B-Inspired Mama

photo used with permission of B-Inspired Mama

photo used with permission of B-Inspired Mama

Cool Food Blog

Seashells & Sunflowers is a very cool food blog of Argentine recipes written by an American living in Argentina.  Since Pope Francis is Argentinian, I’ve wanted to know more about Argentina, as I’m sure a lot of people have.  And that includes the food.  Last year, I learned about empanadas, and a few years before that, alfajores, of which there are recipes on the site.  Any place with stuffed provolone cheese has to be good.  With 60% of the population of Argentina having some Italian ancestry, Argentine food reflects an Italian influence.  A recipe I’ve seen associated with Argentina is faina, a flatbread made from chickpea flour.  Italian influence can be seen in this Tarta Pascualina or Easter pie.  If you’re looking for more Easter recipes, try this rosca de Pascua, or Easter bread ring.

Cool Food Blog

Catholic Cuisine is a very cool food blog with recipes that celebrate the feasts and seasons of the liturgical year, including recipes for many saints’ feast days.  With St. Patrick’s Day coming up, the site has traditional St. Patrick’s Day recipes like soda bread and potato pancakes as well as creative dishes like an Irish flag veggie tray or candied shamrocks.  The site also has many meatless and fish dishes for Lent.  There are recipes for St. Joseph’s Day, coming up on March 19.  And egg bread and lamb cake for Easter.  The site also has a lot of recipes to make with kids.