Category Archives: Pasta

Some South American Italian in the Triangle at Piola

When Italians settled in the United States about 100 years ago, some also settled in South America, especially Argentina. However, a critical difference is that the majority of Italian immigrants to the United States were from Southern Italy and the majority to South America were from Northern Italy. So the Italian food in both areas reflects that. I write about Italian food in South America and around the globe in my new book, Authentic Italian: The Real Story of Italy’s Food and Its People, available at Amazon.com.

Authentic Italian

One of the things I write about in the book is catupiry cheese, a soft cheese that tastes like a cross between ricotta and velvety burrata. Catupiry cheese was created in 1911 by a Brazilian Italian named Mario Silvestrini. For the most part, it is used in the same way we use cream cheese. However, it is different from cream cheese. It is also used on pizza and you can try it in the Triangle at Piola in North Hills in Raleigh. Piola is an Italian pizza chain from Treviso (near Venice in Northeastern Italy) with locations in Italy, South America and Raleigh.

Pizza from Piola with catupiry cheese

Another interesting South American Italian tradition that I mention in my book is eating ñoqui/ñoquis, or gnocchi, on the 29th of the month. Piola highlights this tradition. While Southern Italians eat gnocchi as well, it is associated more with Northern Italian cuisine, and that is probably why it is more popular in South American countries with Italian populations, like Argentina and Uruguay.

Gnocchi Legnano from Piola

–Dina Di Maio

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The Italian Pantry: Anchovies

Anchovies are little fish that you find in tin cans or small glass jars in the grocery store either in the Italian section or the canned fish section. They are packed in olive oil (or should be). Usually they come from somewhere in the Mediterranean.

What is it used for? Our most popular and frequent use of anchovies is as a base for a pasta sauce. You put them whole from the can into the pan with olive oil and garlic and they will dissolve (even the little bones). And this is the sauce you use for a macaroni like spaghetti. It’s similar to an aglio e olio sauce with the addition of the anchovies.

–Dina Di Maio

The Italian Pantry: Pasta

Is there an Italian pantry without pasta? First of all, we always called pasta by its other name, macaroni, and in historical books, it is referred to as maccheroni. Food media and restaurants will tout fresh pasta as best, but that is purely subjective. (And begs the question, why can’t both be good? Oh! I know–dried macaroni is associated with Southern Italy, that’s why.) The myths about pasta/macaroni are being dispelled–it wasn’t brought to Italy from China through Marco Polo. The current thought is that it came to Sicily from the Middle East, but there is evidence that people on the Italic peninsula have been eating pasta since ancient times.

Today, Italians keep many different types of pasta shapes in their pantries. That is because pasta serves different purposes. Some are used with tomato sauce/gravy. Some are used with other sauces. And some are used in soups. The classic shapes Italians and my family have always had are spaghetti, capellini, rigatoni, ziti, penne, perciatelli, cavatelli, fettuccine, acini di pepe, ditalini, shells, ravioli, manicotti, lasagne, linguine, mafalde and gnocchi. There are many other shapes, some are regional and some are new. But I would say the ones I’ve listed are standard.

What is it used for? Our #1 use for pasta is the tomato sauce/gravy.

fusilli with ricotta

Our favorite shapes for this are spaghetti, fusilli and rigatoni, but we also like capellini, ziti, penne, cavatelli, ravioli, manicotti, gnocchi, lasagne and mafalde. We also use some of these shapes with other sauces like broccoli sauce, cauliflower sauce, aglio e olio, etc.

spaghetti with broccoli sauce

If we are making a soup like lentil or pasta fazool (pasta fagioli), then we would use ditalini or another small pasta.

IMG_0022

If we’re making Genovese sauce, we use perciatelli. If we’re making pastina, we use acini di pepe. If we’re making a seafood-based sauce, we use linguine.

If we’re making a cream-based sauce, fettuccine or gnocchi. (However, cream-based sauces are not in our traditional repertoire.)

–Dina Di Maio

My Book, Authentic Italian, Is Now Available

Authentic Italian

Authentic Italian: The Real Story of Italy’s Food and Its People

by Dina M. Di Maio

Available from Amazon.com

Pizza. Spaghetti and meatballs. Are these beloved foods Italian or American?

Italy declares pizza from Naples the only true pizza, but what about New York, New Haven, and Chicago pizza? The media says spaghetti and meatballs isn’t found in Italy, but it exists around the globe. Worldwide, people regard pizza and spaghetti and meatballs as Italian. Why? Because the Italian immigrants to the United States brought their foodways with them 100 years ago and created successful food-related businesses. But a new message is emerging–that the only real Italian food comes from the contemporary Italian mainland. However, this ideology negatively affects Italian Americans, who still face discrimination that pervades the culture–from movies and TV to religion, academia, the workplace, and every aspect of their existence.

In Authentic Italian, Italian-American food writer Dina M. Di Maio explores the history and food contributions of Italian immigrants in the United States and beyond. With thorough research and evidence, Di Maio proves the classic dishes like pizza and spaghetti and meatballs so beloved by the world are, indeed, Italian. Much more than a food history, Authentic Italian packs a sociopolitical punch and shows that the Italian-American people made Italian food what it is today. They and their food are real, true, and authentic Italian.

Little Italy Isn’t Dead: Puglia

Periodically, there’s an article about how Little Italy is dead or dying. Yes, it’s more of a tourist destination and less of a neighborhood where Italian people live. There are still some Italians there, and there are Italian-American-owned businesses there. A recent article in the New York Times made me want to write a series on Little Italy Isn’t Dead and feature some of the businesses there.

Puglia

In 1919, Italian immigrant Gregorio Garofalo opened Puglia, named after the region in Italy where he was from. The restaurant used to serve Italian specialties like capozello (sheep’s head) and tripe, but now its menu includes more standard and popular Italian favorites. Puglia is known for its entertainment. It’s a good stop during the San Gennaro festival too.

Little Italy Isn’t Dead: Piemonte Ravioli

Periodically, there’s an article about how Little Italy is dead or dying. Yes, it’s more of a tourist destination and less of a neighborhood where Italian people live. There are still some Italians there, and there are Italian-American-owned businesses there. A recent article in the New York Times made me want to write a series on Little Italy Isn’t Dead and feature some of the businesses there.

Piemonte Ravioli

Piemonte Ravioli was opened in 1920 by a Genoese immigrant with the last name of Piemonte. In 1955, Mario Bertorelli from Parma bought it. Today, it is run by him and his son, Flavio. The store has a plethora of fresh and dried pasta. They tell photographers James and Karla Murray in Store Front that they use the original recipes from the Piemonte family. They use cheese from Alleva Dairy, and they make their own pasta sauces from their family recipes. Piemonte is also housed in a landmarked building.

Top 10 Foods to Get at NYC’s San Gennaro Festival

This list of top 10 foods to get at NYC’s San Gennaro Festival in Little Italy is the definitive guide to the traditional foods eaten by Italian Americans.

1. If you try nothing else at the San Gennaro festival, you have to try cannoli.

La Bella Ferrara cannoli

Where to get cannoli:  the legendary Ferrara on Grand Street and Mulberry, La Bella Ferrara on Mulberry, Caffe Palermo on Mulberry, Caffe Roma corner of Mulberry and Broome.

2. Sausage and peppers sandwiches–When Italians go to festivals, this is what they get.

Where to get sausage and peppers–at a stand.

3.  Zeppole are fried dough balls in powdered sugar–a staple of Italian festivals.

Where to get zeppole–at a stand.

4.  Clams

Where to get clams–at a stand, Umberto’s Clam House on Mulberry.

5.  Pizza/calzones

Where to get pizza/calzones–Sal’s on Broome Street (the fried calzone is to die for!), the first pizzeria in America–Lombardi’s on Spring Street.

6.  Torrone–Italian nutty nougat confection

Where to get torrone–at a stand or at Ferrara on Grand.

7.  Italian cookies

Where to get Italian cookies–the legendary Ferrara on Grand, La Bella Ferrara on Mulberry, at a stand.

8.  Gelato

Where to get gelato–Ferrara on Grand, Caffe Roma on Broome, Mo on Mulberry.

9.  Pasta

Where to get pasta–Puglia on Hester, Vincent’s on Hester/Mott, Angelo’s of Mulberry Street, Benito One on Mulberry.

10. Italian pastries

Where to get Italian pastries–the legendary Ferrara on Grand Street and Mulberry, La Bella Ferrara on Mulberry, Caffe Palermo on Mulberry, Caffe Roma corner of Mulberry and Broome.

–Dina Di Maio, author of Authentic Italian: The Real Story of Italy’s Food and Its People, available at Amazon.com

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