Little Italy Isn’t Dead: Di Palo’s

Periodically, there’s an article about how Little Italy is dead or dying. Yes, it’s more of a tourist destination and less of a neighborhood where Italian people live. There are still some Italians there, and there are Italian-American-owned businesses there. A recent article in the New York Times made me want to write a series on Little Italy Isn’t Dead and feature some of the businesses there.

Di Palo’s

Concetta Di Palo and her husband, Luigi Santomauro, opened Di Palo’s in Little Italy in 1925 as a dairy. Concetta was from the Basilicata region of Italy. Now, in addition to ricotta and mozzarella, Di Palo’s carries a myriad of Italian grocery and specialty items. It is an overwhelming experience for the senses to see the hanging provolone cheese and prosciutto and salami and the variety of unique items on the shelves and in the refrigerated case. The shop is still family-owned today and a popular spot for foodies. It is like an old school deli, so be sure to take a number because it’s always crowded here.

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